Doom 3 revisited: Communications

If a shipment of chainsaws gets accidentally routed to Mars,  you know there will be trouble. After all, what can you do with chainsaws on mars? Your friendly neighborhood zombies figured it out, and are quite eager to show you: Cutting up things.

The other noteworthy thing about Communications Transfer is the service lift. Now I like moving, rotating, extending gizmos with lights on them, and this one doesn’t disappoint. There is a small network of tracks and service stations and bridges that can be explored using this nifty toy.

Verily, it is dark in there, and demons are prowling the… catwalks? Remember, cutting things up, and remember, the flashlight. Some parts of this level are pretty spooky – it is the orange version of the Alpha Labs, only with more blood, more darkness, bigger demons, chainsaws and  — A BERSERK POWERUP!!11!1  Quite weird combination of things, but unlikely combinations often end up working well, at least this one definitely does.

A short walk across the Martian surface later: Communications.

Now this is one ugly level. It’s dirty, run down, and generally greasy, bloody, and unwelcoming. Only its mother could love it, if it actually had a mother. It’s actually not unlike a mix of Enpro and Mars City Underground, only more cramped, darker, and with a different monster lineup. It is actually full of Z-Secs with shields, shotguns, and machine guns supported mostly by cacodemons and imps. It is also hard. There are a couple gadgets and many ominous red lights, but the only useful thing is a machine that churns out sentry bots. If yours is broken, you can return there and get a new one, which is quite nifty.

Did I mention it is ugly? Most of the level looks like this. It’s almost as if its only purpose was to be ugly and try to kill you. However, the gameplay is almost as good as Enpro‘s, meaning it is a run-and-gun level, with sentry bots, but hard and short on ammo. It’s a shotgun level. Grenades actually come in handy here.

I had a hard time liking this at first, but it grew on me.

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