Category Archives: media

Oh please. Of course encrypted e-mail is still secure.

Various media have hyped a recently publicized paper about vulnerabilities of PGP encrypted e-mail, saying things like “e-mail no longer a secure method of communication“.

This is a load of BS.

Werner Koch, author of GNU Privacy Guard (GPG), has stated that such exploits have been known for almost 20 years and countermeasures have long been developed. GPG throws a hard error (since 2015) if the countermeasure is not detected upon decryption.

Enigmail, the Mozilla Thunderbird PGP addon, includes a fix (since February) that prevents any content being rendered to the user if GPG throws this error. This basically fixes the problem.

Claiming that PGP has been broken, the encryption itself has been broken, and telling users to not send encrypted e-mails anymore is WRONG.

I have to wonder if this is some kind of scheme or cyberattack meant to discredit email encryption as a whole. The use of encryption is obviously a thorn in the side of various agencies and third parties who would like you to stop using it.

In short: Use GnuPG and Enigmail, use the latest versions, disable loading third-party content from the web, or disable viewing HTML mails completely (if you’re paranoid, you probably did this already). Don’t panic.

 

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Up Against

upagainst_overview

Quick two-player duel map, “Up Against”, for Command & Conquer 3 Kane’s Wrath.  Download available from ModDB.

Took about three days to make. It’s very fun for me to learn new tools of game making, including historical ones, so I do these little one-offs sometimes. Last time it was Torchlight, I believe, but I got bored with that before I could finish the map. Kane’s Wrath still has a player base, so perhaps this ends up in a map pack or something. That would be cool.

Got any suggestions as to what else I should try?


Level designer popcorn

Rejoice, children of Nod! Small excursion into level design for an RTS game, in this case Command and Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars / Kane’s Wrath. An old game by now, but still has a few tricks up its sleeve such as the rather gorgeous volumetric light ray effect that lends the game world a feeling of depth and mystery. Stock maps often go for a greenish fog to portray the game’s creeping Tiberium infestation, but I chose a blood red hue which I think goes well with the desert textures.

Here’s without post processing. See the difference. My eyes! It just blends a lot better on the high settings, doesn’t it.

I’m just practicing detailing, checking out the wealth of assets and having some fun. I’ll file it under art practice. *cough* The game is well worth checking out, the level editor “Worldbuilder” is freely available. Nice textures, fully 3D, realtime lighting and post processing options, what’s not to like? Makes for an excellent toy.


Well worth watching

Music producer and composer Rick Beato sounds off with game composer and programmer Brian Schmidt.

From 1999-2008, Schmidt was the program manager of the Xbox Audio and Voice Technologies division at Microsoft and was responsible for much of the audio architecture for the Xbox and Xbox 360. He created the start up sound for the original Xbox console, using ‘old-school’ techniques to create an 8-second sound using only 25 kilobytes of memory. (Wikipedia)

We learn about the history of the craft and working on game audio using tools such as FMOD. Highly recommended if you’re doing audio for video games. Rick Beato’s entire channel is very good for people interested in music.


Yep, why not have two

It has recently come to pass that another conlang (artificial language) was added to Scout’s Journey. There are two talking alien factions, so…

It’s an interesting challenge to make aliens talk believably. Luckily, the two factions are quite different; one is militaristic, invasive and arrogant, the other is comparatively peaceful and spiritual. I find these two contrasting characters make it easy to form words and sentences that have different tones to them.

Here’s some examples from Language A:

 

HASTINGS
(at the top of his lungs)
Etoye, ido ota’a dulzug, ashide sharug’a!
Listen, we are not enemies, we are allies!

 

ABBOT
Hasuka’a gise gosiden.
Praised be the Eater of Stars.

 

VANDRELL
Ashik dor dulzug’a.
See, the enemy is there.

 

BORTAS
Hata, shidu ota dolyug.
Yeah, it’s an attack.

 

SCOURGE SERGEANT
Ido akocha!
Show no mercy!

 

SCOURGE SOLDIER
Falridoye asukh.
Take cover, firing.

 

And here’s Language B:

 

KINGFISHER
A silute eske onomite naanutat, omote.
The stars are beautiful tonight, Grandfather.

 

KINGFISHER
Ho kete ta?
What does she want?

 

STAR-­GAZER
(deadpan)
Kenu’t skei-­hostut etet.
She wants to find the Scourge.

 

KINGFISHER
Ho wa ketah ta?
What is her name?

 

STAR­-GAZER
Ote wa menut kite.
She who finds the way.

 

KINGFISHER
Eska minu ketah.
Good name.

 

While I wrote a bunch of grammar for the first one and tried to stick to it, I tend to just wing it with the second one. Once I write banter for their battle groups, I might have to lay down some rules though.

This might seem like overkill, but it’s actually really fun to do. And it makes the game world more plausible.

Technically, there is a third alien faction, but they’re insects. I’ll probably let them use a pure click/noise language. Maybe gestures, too.


Check this out

Those of you interested in orchestral soundtrack stuff may want to check out the new version 2 of Paul Battersby’s Virtual Playing Orchestra, a free VO sample library in sfz format.

A beautiful sounding full virtual orchestra at your fingertips for free, VPO pulls the best samples from Sonatina and a few other sources to create a pretty well rounded library that lets you compose complete orchestral scores in software such as Reaper.

Free as in beer. The new version is very nice and not such a big download.

Grab it while it’s hot. And maybe join us at Scoring Central Forums.


Musical Prison Break

This piece of music was originally done a couple years back, in a software that doesn’t allow exporting the MIDI data. Since I now work in Reaper, I had to reprogram it by hand from start to finish. The upside of this spectacle is that I can finally continue working on it.

Most of the strings part was done by the violins in the old version, because I didn’t know a whole lot about how to orchestrate things, i.e. spread them out across all the different instruments. So I wrote a violin part that should have been a viola part, and kept wondering what to do with the violas. Turns out the joke is on me.

The old version had eight instrument tracks; the new version has 23, i.e. most of the orchestra. There’s now trumpets in there, tuba, full woodwind section, solo oboe, celli, and viola. Plus the relatively new mixing and mastering chains and seperate reverb units done per section of the orchestra. Plus a decidedly non-orchestral effect: artificial stereo echo on the harp. I figure I can take some liberties like that if it adds some kick.

Best of all, I’ve got the raw data now, so FREEDOM!