Good progress recently

After weeks of bottling up various ideas and feeling blocked or uninspired, I got down to work again. My massive editing and rewriting pass had stopped at the end of Chapter 3 of Scout’s Journey, half a year ago, and the next two chapters were a mess of stuff in my head, especially Chapter 5. I knew where I wanted to go with it all, but couldn’t put it in a mental order that I could have written down. And I had gotten some feedback that challenged me to make my characters more distinctive. So I kinda started very loosely rewriting a scene in Chapter 1 where my two protagonists (Scout herself and the main impact character) have their first one-on-one. This was a place where I could lay on some more character. I carried that around for a couple days, then got down to sorting it out and editing it down. It was OK. I was actually working again.

Next thing, I had one of those moments where you wake up with a completely new scene in your head that goes in the place of an old one. But this was so much better. It was the part of the game where Scout is introduced. At first this new scene appeared very unlike everything else, except Scout was fully characterized in two and a half pages and like 10 lines of dialogue. It was too good to be true. Sometimes inspiration strikes out of the blue and gives you a huge puzzle piece that you were only dimly aware you needed. But boy, this does a heck of a lot to kickstart Scout’s entire character. And it really drives everything that happens in Chapter 1.

Around the same time, I had another idea that kinda pulls in an important stringer in a layer of the game that has to do with Scout’s ability to connect with a character who becomes a major ally. The key here was that Scout can do something that otherwise, only children can. It’s like she has access to a part of her mind that allows her to do pretty unique things. This was very easy to integrate, it required rewriting a couple lines only, but at the same time it was like putting an additional steel I-beam into a building that really reinforces the entire thing. Afterwards I didn’t understand how I could have missed that –  everything I had previously written was so close to the right place but the spark just didn’t connect. Well, it’s done now.

Then, Chapter 4 started to assemble itself into something that made a lot of sense. Chapter 4 is very focused on Scout and her exploration, stealth and combat abilities. Real first person action stuff, with not a lot of story interference and almost a feel of loneliness to it. This makes for a nice contrast with Chapter 3, which is unusually story heavy with several factions and a dozen characters colliding like a car crash among a lot of scripted stuff. So I really started to lose my doubts about the chapter sequence – giving the player all that freedom and even having an extended FPS sequence at the end of Chapter 4 is a good thing at that point in the game. The player is going to be like, “let me play!” after Chapter 3, and this should just deliver nicely.

But I only sketched it out for now, I’m gonna do the actual rewrite later, because I got real busy with Chapter 7, which is to say, the endgame. I got it to the point where the end kinda mirrors the beginning, which was one of the criticisms I had gotten – that the end didn’t work. Well, it does now.

I got Chapter 5 buzzing around my head – it’s another exploration heavy thing with a main storyline quest that spans the entire game world – but I haven’t done much rewriting yet. I wrote a new chapter ending because a main thing needed to be foreshadowed for the new ending. I guess I’ll just splatter it all over the page and then clean it up some time from now. I decided against Scout having a romance option in there though, it’s just not that kind of game. Otherwise it’s currently like a ball of yarn needing to be unravelled.

Anyway, that’s the progress report. It’s not like I’m doing nothing. I’m surprised that the middle chapters are such a bitch to get right, but I’m closing in on them. I’ve got Chapters 1-3 and 7 largely done and major inroads into 4, 5 and 6.

Phew.

 

 

 

 

 

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Well worth watching

Music producer and composer Rick Beato sounds off with game composer and programmer Brian Schmidt.

From 1999-2008, Schmidt was the program manager of the Xbox Audio and Voice Technologies division at Microsoft and was responsible for much of the audio architecture for the Xbox and Xbox 360. He created the start up sound for the original Xbox console, using ‘old-school’ techniques to create an 8-second sound using only 25 kilobytes of memory. (Wikipedia)

We learn about the history of the craft and working on game audio using tools such as FMOD. Highly recommended if you’re doing audio for video games. Rick Beato’s entire channel is very good for people interested in music.


Looking at it like this

Here’s a blurb I wrote for a writing discussion elsewhere to describe the way I handle the “chosen one” trope in Scout’s Journey, but I thought better of it and posted it here for your amusement and to jog my memory. Because I found this the first pretty apt description of it that I wrote. It almost gives me a new perspective.

“She is brought in unaware by forces outside her control, who intend her to be a sacrifice to a Big Bad. The player learns this before she does. Along the way, it turns out that she does have a skill, making friends with people who looked like certain enemies, thus kicking off a conflict in the enemy faction which ends up helping her. Through sheer curiosity, she makes contact with someone who is equally lost, and who turns out to be Big Bad’s nemesis. She only learns this through open-mindedness and careful listening. The prophecy comes in the form of a children’s story. This nemesis has to be freed from an age of imprisonment; as for what she ends up having to do, she only understands right when Big Bad gets his paws on her.”

In other news, I got the flu, and it sucks. I forgot how much it sucks.

Take care guys, and whack a nazi for me when you see one. Seriously, what’s going on with the world?

 

 


No “Mary Sue”

After learning what people mean by “Mary Sue”, I took this test for Scout, my protagonist, and scored extremely low (4 points; 16 before applying “de-suifiers”).

Yes, she figures in an otherworldly prophecy. But hey, she’s a protagonist. I guess she’s solid.

In other words, yes, the writing slavery goes on.


Yep, why not have two

It has recently come to pass that another conlang (artificial language) was added to Scout’s Journey. There are two talking alien factions, so…

It’s an interesting challenge to make aliens talk believably. Luckily, the two factions are quite different; one is militaristic, invasive and arrogant, the other is comparatively peaceful and spiritual. I find these two contrasting characters make it easy to form words and sentences that have different tones to them.

Here’s some examples from Language A:

 

HASTINGS
(at the top of his lungs)
Etoye, ido ota’a dulzug, ashide sharug’a!
Listen, we are not enemies, we are allies!

 

ABBOT
Hasuka’a gise gosiden.
Praised be the Eater of Stars.

 

VANDRELL
Ashik dor dulzug’a.
See, the enemy is there.

 

BORTAS
Hata, shidu ota dolyug.
Yeah, it’s an attack.

 

SCOURGE SERGEANT
Ido akocha!
Show no mercy!

 

SCOURGE SOLDIER
Falridoye asukh.
Take cover, firing.

 

And here’s Language B:

 

KINGFISHER
A silute eske onomite naanutat, omote.
The stars are beautiful tonight, Grandfather.

 

KINGFISHER
Ho kete ta?
What does she want?

 

STAR-­GAZER
(deadpan)
Kenu’t skei-­hostut etet.
She wants to find the Scourge.

 

KINGFISHER
Ho wa ketah ta?
What is her name?

 

STAR­-GAZER
Ote wa menut kite.
She who finds the way.

 

KINGFISHER
Eska minu ketah.
Good name.

 

While I wrote a bunch of grammar for the first one and tried to stick to it, I tend to just wing it with the second one. Once I write banter for their battle groups, I might have to lay down some rules though.

This might seem like overkill, but it’s actually really fun to do. And it makes the game world more plausible.

Technically, there is a third alien faction, but they’re insects. I’ll probably let them use a pure click/noise language. Maybe gestures, too.


Getting to know you

Time for an update.

There’s not much new on the Western front. I’ve been in another extensive rewriting and editing process on the Scout’s Journey script. To put it simply, it’s getting a lot better. I think it might end up really good. I’m still totally convinced of the characters and the plot. There’s gold in there, I just have to bring it out and make it shine.

Yes, it’s still a back-breaking process. It’s like going to the desert to find your vision AND learning basic survival skills at the same time.

Anyway, there’s something worth telling. I talked to a friend because I’m having trouble writing Scout’s character, especially her emotions and how she reacts when confronted with obstacles. I ended up doing a Myers-Briggs personality test and answered 100 questions while channeling Scout’s mindset, as if I was acting out her personality. Lo and behold, it was very interesting.

Scout is an INFP-T personality type according to the test. This means introverted, intuitive, feeling and prospecting, as opposed to more rational/assertive behaviour. This type belongs to the diplomat group and is called the healer or mediator. Only 4% of people share this personality.

Put simply, it could mean Scout has trouble with social activities or keeping down a regular job, tends to take things too personally and think too much of others instead of herself (in the game, she actually has a kind of performance anxiety, which is fitting). On the upside, she is guided by very strong feelings about right and wrong and can be supernaturally determined and adaptive if she actually discovers a worthy cause. She is a troubled, outwardly weak-looking person initially underestimated by others, but turns into an unstoppable guided missile under certain conditions.

Funnily enough, this is exactly what happens in the script. So I guess that is coherent and I managed to write that personality type relatively well so far without actually thinking about it in psychological terms.

The questionnaire and the analysis will certainly make her even more fun to write.

So just you know, there is progress being made, just nothing that could be expressed in screenshots unfortunately. We’ll return to that later.

Well, here’s one. Scout’s test result.

scout_personality


Check this out

Those of you interested in orchestral soundtrack stuff may want to check out the new version 2 of Paul Battersby’s Virtual Playing Orchestra, a free VO sample library in sfz format.

A beautiful sounding full virtual orchestra at your fingertips for free, VPO pulls the best samples from Sonatina and a few other sources to create a pretty well rounded library that lets you compose complete orchestral scores in software such as Reaper.

Free as in beer. The new version is very nice and not such a big download.

Grab it while it’s hot. And maybe join us at Scoring Central Forums.